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20130801
20130831
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
anniversary of the march on washington and the legacy of martin luther king, junior how radicalo forget this was, how kennedys white house tried to get the andnizers to call it off, how the majority of americans had an unfavorable view of it. the peaceful protest seemed impossible to fathom. violence.d of it is universally acknowledged as one of the seminal events of the 20th century as they stood to demand those jobs and freedom. epic tome is considered the gold standard for that era. all this is coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. inc. you. thank you. >> joining us now to kick off these three nights of this historicon anniversary is the author of "the king years." fromr branch joins us washington. it is good to have you back on the program. >> i have been. talking and getting the message out. let me start with the obvious questions. how does the march on washington ?it into this narrative >> it comes in 1963, when the sees politicsly by the throat because of the demonstrations in birmingham earlier that spring culminating ofthe citiz
of converging -- thousands are converging on the nation's capital to reenact the famous march on washington. tomorrow marks the 50th anniversary. we sat down with one family who wrote the bus to d.c. on that day in 1963. chambers still remember's the song she sang 50 years ago. ♪ songs that served as the soundtrack of her experience and thousands of others on the march on washington. ♪ oh freedom she kept her music sheet and plenty of other memorabilia. like his organizing manual featuring the event lineup. and other icons of the civil rights movement. she made sure she had her front seat. >> i was standing down from where the speaker was. i was so tickled because it could look right up and see him. he was eloquent. he was not pushy. it was a tremendous experience because like you say there was a certain tension because of what could happen. there was such track quality and peace you could not believe it. >> hannah was only 30 when she heard dr. king speak your -- her e. one and herfeeling family to witness that pivotal moment. -- not the only one in her family to witness that pivotal m
cannot even get traction in washington talking about poverty. president barack obama and the members of congress, both the left and the right -- everybody has to it knowledge that they spend so much more time in washington talking about the middle class, they are obsessed, but we cannot get a conversation about poverty. why is that? >> you said it. it is a political sort of poll tested way to try to get that extra are centage point in terms of public opinion. that priorgs political leaders did, and certainly our civil rights leaders did, was they went against public opinion. they really said this is the morally right inc. to do, and we need to move the country in that direction. unfortunately, that type of leadership we don't see today. this president campaigned on raising the minimum wage. at one point, he was for raising it to even a higher level than he has suggested of late that he wants to raise it to. why is he negotiating against himself? why can't politicians understand that americans are hurting, that we need a living wage, not a minimum wage? >> that is really an important
in atlanta. she has been in washington for all the events and joins us tonight from washington. good to have you on this program. sense of how you have felt throughout these honoring the event and your father. you always want the person back with you. in that vein it has been exciting, because it speaks to of thenitude contribution he made that we are here looking at and talking about that time that was so and able to andbrate the progress recognize we have so much to do. thoughtsat are your about your mother and your for thist being around celebration? and foremost my father talked about his four little children. there are only three of us left. that void is very much felt. i say all the time martin luther king is different from the martin luther king today, and i to my mother, whose tireless efforts to keep his legacy alive, and perhaps we celebrating,n be because it was 1983, and every five years there was an so iersary remembrance, think about her, because we are here in many respects, and she cannot forget the tremendous contributions, and we cannot forget there is so much work to .o th
officials might have met in washington, but the fact president obama called off a planned summit with vladimir putin is a sign of underlying tensions. many say this is not just about politics, but personality. and as long as barack obama and leonard could remain in office, tensions between america and russia will continue to exist. the men get on? at a white house press conference today, president obama gave us some insight. >> i know the press likes to focus on body language. slouch likekind of the board kit in the back of the conversation. the truth is when we're in conversations together, it is often very productive. >> body language aside. right now, there are no plans for a summit between these two men. the talks are being seen as a positive step in u.s.-russia relations. i discussed u.s. relations with russia with the former u.s. defense secretary william cohen. and i asked just how bad the relationship is. >> it has gotten very cool in the last several years, but since putin came back into power to be for sure. there were some helpful provisions and incentives to get back
in the civil rights movment." he joins us from washington. taylor, good to have you on the program. >> i wish i could be with you. tavis: i wish we could have you in the studio. you have spent basically your life working on this icon a trilogy, and then you end up with a book that basically distills it all down. why did you do this? >> teachers have told me for many years that while they love the story, 800-page books are a little much to assign college students, let alone high school, and that weighed on me. the other thing is that it has been 50 years since the crest of the movement, and america still does not really appreciate how much we benefit from that. there are still many people hiding from the great benefits of the 1960's, so i wanted to do something to crystallize that. the lessons from the people in the civil rights era. tavis: what lessons do you think that the american public, by and large, as we approach the anniversary -- we will talk about that in a moment -- what do they still seem blind to? >> george wallace pledged segregation forever. this country was segregated. all throug
? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting live from washington. denies that the rebels hit his convoy today as enjoying ase, and newfound freedom in pakistan. a bbc story free to this young girl from forced labor and hopefully opened a world of opportunity. >> the biggest change is she can take her place in the classroom and have a chance to learn. this seemed impossible before. their photograph captured faces -- a look at the groundbreaking work of walter evans. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the globe. the syrian government is describing rebel claims that the motorcade was hit today. assassination the attempt happened as he was going to a mosque to celebrate the end of ramadan. video of him unharmed has surfaced. >> no longer do western leaders say that president assad will be gone in months. his forces are making gains in the battlefield, and the war could last for years, leading to a refugee crisis of epic proportions. confidence is his message. on state television today he was shown smiling as he attended prayer
." reporting from washington, i'm jane o'brien. symbolic way felt president -- zimbabwe's president robert mugabe takes on rivals. james"whitey" bulger is found guilty. and we will meet the man who made it all the way to san francisco after getting a double long transplant. -- double lung transplant. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. in his first speech since the disputed july 31st election, zimbabwe's president robert mu gabe viciously attacked his opponents, saying they can "go and hang themselves." the chargey denied but at the vote was rigged. correspondent andrew harding has this report. victory?imous in not president mugabe's style. be's style.ident muga he had this to say. those who cannot handle defeat, can go hang themselves, said mr. mugabe. yet beenly he has not sworn in for another term. his opponents insist they have proof the election was stolen. -- theefeatedmdc nationd mdc spoke of a in mourning. willhave said they challenge the entire process in court. ehe court sides with mr. mugab in such matters. while the legal wrangling may
. relations between russia and washington have never been more, has hadpresident obama a major diplomatic snub aimed at president putin. edward snowden is at the center of the latest round. the former contractor fled america after leaking government secrets. the u.s. is unhappy after russia granted him asylum to stay there. president obama made his feelings clear. >> they have been times where they slip back into -- what i consistently say to them and president putin is, that is the past. we got to think about the future, and there is no reason why we should not be able to cooperate better than we do. the two men to work together when it comes to iran, north korea, and afghanistan. but relations between the two remain strained on a number of issues. over are tensions resolving the deadly conflict in syria. america's plans for a missile defense team on russia's doorstep has angered moscow and the white house is highly critical of russia's human rights record. the russian government says it is disappointed in today's announcement. many feel it will not damage long-term relations. but the america
is in washington with the latest. >> tens of thousands of protesters clashed with security forces in another day of violence in cairo. the muslim brotherhood calls today the day of rage, and filled the streets to protest the military imposed state of ergency. supporters of ousted leader mohammed morsi and military forces exchanged heavy gunfire and tear gas. there are reports that police officers dressed in civilian clothing joined the crowds and fired off shots. the military responded to the demonstrations with a curfew for cairo and several other cities. today's call for a day of rage comes in response to the bloodshed earlier this week that left more than 600 dead in one day alone. president obama and other world leaders have condemned the violence and the u.s. has canceled a joint military exercise with egypt that was scheduled for next month. reporting from washington, i'm sally kidd. >> here at home, egyptian americans are watching what's what happening closely and reacting, lowell melser giants us from highlandtown with more. >> cocoa's market here on eastern avenue is a very popular plac
celebrate 50 years this coming august. before king got to washington to deliver this speech, he went to detroit. it was in destroyed he worked it out. he used it as a testing ground. first in detroit. grace lee boggs was in the audience. >> i was an organizer. rex she was an organizer when dr. king came to detroit. 100,000 people. >> 2000 people. tavis: -- 200,000 people. tavis: i am only 48, but your memory is better than mine. >> the alabama christian movement for human rights to boycott merchants during the easter season, and they messed up the economy, so they jailed martin luther king. they turned fire hoses on them, and people saw that all over the and they organized a rally to protest, and only a few people showed up. clegg was an agitator in the black movement. said, we should scare the devil out of the people, so we started organizing. we decided to meet in churches and announce the march. pouring in from all across the state. it electrified the city, and it made a huge difference in the movement. time i get to speak in detroit, i kissed the ground in reference to what this
. thank you. >> i'm evan smith. he's a 35 year veteran of the washington post, widely hailed as one of the most insightful and best source political reporters in the country. he's dan blaz, this is overheard. >> dan dallas, welcome. good on to see you again. >> always glad to be in austin. >> 35 years at the post means that jimmy carter was president when you came to the paper. so wash hasn't changed. >> no, no. exactly the same. >> exactly the same. >> we all still have lust in our hearts. >> everyone gets along. >> a little bit of malaise, but if you can get past that, it's fine. >> then there was a reagan period. >> yeah, a little bit of change and then it came back. you witnessed -- we'll talk about journalism shortly, but we'll talk about politics and specifically congress and the presidency and the relationship between the two. you witnessed over 35 years things change and change again and change again. a lot of people think that today the relationship between congress and the presidency is at an all-time low in terms of the ability to get things done. >> right. i think that's
grados. en los Ángeles, 79 grados, 103 phoen phoenix, el paso con 95, washington 89, la ciudad de los vientos chicago, 89 de mÁxima y miami con 89, pero con este dÍa tan bonito, como que hace falta, no sÉ, sabor, movimiento. chicas? >>> eso! (aplausos) venga. >>> estamos listas? >>> venga. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. >>> les gusta el tato del tiempo muchachos. >>> sÍ. >>> vamos. >>> lo amo. ♪. ♪. ♪. seattle. 80 grados, venga. ♪. ♪. ♪. eh, eh, eh. >>> bravo, las amo. >>> chicas. gracias. >>> jhonny, jhonny, ya. >>> ok, bye. >>> chicas. ahora sÍ, ana las espera, vamos a aprender seÑora juntas, vamos a ponernos en forma a ritmo de terremoto. >>> vengan chicas, no hay nada mejor que iniciar el dÍa haciendo ejercicios. amiga pÓngase el pantalon bien sexy, y a mover el esqueleto, buenos dÍas a todas bellezas, vamos a tonificar cada parte del cuerpo, con diferentes canciones, ritmos. >>> si, el ritmo que me encanta. >>> para hacer ejercicio, el primero es el punk, y vamos a utilizar abdominales, y muslos. >>> vamos a ir, uno, dos, tres, 4,5, 6,
mija. >>> nos vamos pa miami donde estÁ el sol que arde con 89 y washington tenemos en los 80 qÉe les parece. ♪. ♪. ♪. >>> voy contigo. >>> nos vamos para este lado, donde estÁ alla mi gente, porque en california los Ángeles ya se siente, 78♪. ♪. ♪. (risas) sseguimos aquÍ en texas, aqui estÁ san antonio, 96 la gente estÁ que plancha el diablo afuera, quÉ les parece. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. ♪. cual>>> nos vamos. para mi rancho, nos vemos mÁs al rato, quÉ les parece. ♪. ♪. ♪. >>> vÁmonos. ♪. ♪. ♪. (risas) >>> ay quÉ bien! que bÁrbaro. >>> espectacular. >>> espectacular. karlita. >>> muchacha. oye. >>> venga, venga. >>> aquÍ hay que ingeniarselas. >>> sÍ, hay que hacer de todo. >>> hay que justificar el sueldo. >>> cÓmo va. >>> quÉ les parece? ♪. ♪. ♪. >>> ya, ya. >>> ana ya. >>> llegÓ el momento. >>> nos tienes en ascuas hace una hora. >>> de lo que quiero compartir con ustedes, en "despierta amÉrica", y la familia qume ve todos los dÍas, en el 2010, mi vida privada no fue tan privada, me aceptaron con mis errores y fracasos, con lo qu
federaciÓn del salvador, no realizarÁ ningÚn partido. la oficina de intereses de washington en la habina emitiÓ una alerta de cÓlera para estadounidenses que visitan cuba. la habana se dice que calla un brote de la enfermedad mortal para evitar daÑos en la industria turÍstica, no se informÓ de colera importado a estados unidos, pero sÍ hay casos en venezuela e italia, se detectaron 51 casos en la habana a principios del 2013. >>> si presentÓ su solicitud de ciudadanÍa estadounidense tenga cuidado, podrÍa ser victima de un nuevo fraude por telÉfono estafadores llaman por telÉfono a inmigrantes diciendo que hay errores en la informaciÓn de sus solicitudes, y le piden dinero para corregirlos. autoridades migratorias dicen que nunca llaman por telÉfono, y toda notificaciÓn al interesado, se hace por escrito, y recomiendan no dar informaciÓn personal vÍa telefÓnica, como nÚmero de seguro social o pasaporte, serÍan utilizados por los timadores. ademÁs de estafas, los inmigrantes son el centro de controversia, una niÑa de once aÑos divulgÓ un video de internet en respuest
washington in "training day." she has since gone on to make her mark costarring with an array of actors, from johnny depp to matt damon. she's now costarring with ryan gosling and bradley cooper in an emotionally charged movie called "the place beyond the pines," about fathers, sons, and the consequences of the decisions they make. eva plays a single mom trying the best way she can to navigate a life that didn't exactly turn out the way she'd hoped. let's take a look at a clip from the movie. [clip] tavis: i almost didn't recognize you; you're all glammed up today. >> (laughter) >> you do whatever you need to do. >> what are you going to do? wax i am going to do what i have to do. going to go to school. i am going to take care of jason. i work here. that is what i am doing. that is my life. tavis: i almost didn't recognize you; you're all glammed up today. >> (laughter) tavis: this flick, for those who haven't seen it and will, obviously, you're not playing up all of the glam. >> no, no. actually, that's the beauty of being an actress, is that you hopefully get to have different roles and rea
next time for a honoringion with -- the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there's a saying that dr. king had, and he said, "there's always a right time to do the right thing." i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we're only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. and walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs. >>> a new approach could get more of oakland's african-american boys graduating high school instead of dying young. >> if you had not received the kind of support as a by that you are providing to these african-american boys at this school where would you be today? >> i'd be in san quentin, or dead. >> black men are teaching and mentoring black boys in hopes of shifting the odds toward success and survival. >> we're trying to make transformations. if you look at the statistics in oakland, we're
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)